Enhancing Agency Budget Transparency, Opportunities to Study Science and Environmental Protections

Fiscal Year Funding Plus Legislative Support for Health Care Professionals and Physical Activity for All Americans

Blocking Voter Expansion, Proposing Greater Scrutiny of Inspectors General, and Paving the Way for Climate Change Measures

Recognizing the Abolishment of Slavery and Compensating Law Enforcement, Overseas Federal Employees and Disaster Relief Victims

Addressing Hate Crimes, Banks Serving the Cannabis Industry and Unilateral Power to Restrict Immigration

Advancing Healthcare Initiatives, Small Business Funding and Protecting the Elderly from Scams

Economic Stimulus, Making the Post Office Solvent Again, Gun Control, Voting Rights and Restricting China’s Influence

Gun Control, Voting RightsAmerican Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (HR 1319) – This $1.9 trillion relief bill provides stimulus money to address the continued impact of COVID-19. Provisions include issuing $1,400 checks to taxpayers, increasing the Child Tax Credit up to $3,000 and the dependent care credit to $4,000, and providing funds for schools, small businesses, renters and landlords, increased subsidies for Americans who buy individual health insurance, and $160 billion allocated toward vaccine development and distribution. The bill was introduced by Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY) on Jan. 15, first passed in the House on Feb. 27 and in the Senate on March 6, and was signed into law by President Biden on March 11.

SAVE LIVES Act (HR 1276) – This bill was introduced by Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) on Feb. 24. The legislation would authorize the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to furnish a COVID-19 vaccine to veterans ineligible for the VA health care system, who live abroad, and family caregivers of veterans, among others. The bill passed in the House on March 9 and in the Senate on March 17. It has been returned to the House for approval of changes.

USPS Fairness Act (HR 695) – This act would repeal the requirement that the U.S. Postal Service annually prepay future retiree benefits, decades in advance. The current mandate, which was signed into law in 2006, has since threatened the viability of the USPS. While the Post Office generates enough revenue to cover its operating costs, this prepayment of pension and retiree healthcare benefits has pushed its bottom line into the red. The bill was introduced by Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) on Feb. 2 and enjoys bipartisan support.

Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2021 (HR 1620) – This is a reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, a popular law that protects and provides resources for victims of domestic abuse and sexual violence. The bill expired at the end of 2018 after Congress failed to act due to partisan disputes over guns and transgender issues. It was re-introduced by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) on March 8 and passed in the House on March 17. It is currently under consideration in the Senate.

Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021 (HR 8) – This bill establishes new background check requirements for every firearm sale. It prohibits a firearm transfer between private parties unless a licensed gun dealer, manufacturer or importer first takes possession of the firearm to conduct a background check. The bill was introduced by Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA) on March 1 and passed in the House on March 11. This bill is currently under review in the Senate.

For the People Act of 2021 (HR 1) – This bill was introduced by Rep. John Sarbanes (D-MD) on Jan. 4 and passed in the House on March 3. It is currently under consideration in the Senate. The purpose of this legislation is to protect and expand voter rights. Specifically, the bill:

  • Expands voter registration (automatic and same-day registration)
  • Increases voting access (vote-by-mail and early voting)
  • Prohibits removing voters from voter rolls
  • Requires states to establish an independent commission to deploy congressional redistricting
  • Establishes provisions related to election security, including sharing intelligence information with state election officials and supporting states in securing their election systems
  • Prohibits campaign spending by foreign nationals, requires additional disclosure of campaign-related fundraising and spending, mandates additional disclaimers in political advertising, and establishes an alternative campaign funding system for certain federal offices
  • Establishes additional conflict-of-interest and ethics provisions for personnel who work in the three branches of government
  • Requires the president, the vice president, and certain candidates for those offices to disclose 10 years of tax returns

CONFUCIUS Act (S 590) – This bill, also referred to as the Concerns Over Nations Funding University Campus Institutes in the United States Act, is designed to mitigate China’s influence on U.S. post-secondary educational institutions that are directly or indirectly funded by the Chinese government. Specifically, educational institutions contracted with Confucius Institutes that also receive federal funding must include provisions in those agreements that prohibit the application of foreign law on those campuses and grant full control over teaching plans, activities, research grants and employment decisions to the U.S. university. The act was introduced by Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) on March 4 and passed in the Senate on the same day. It is currently under consideration in the House.

Securing Jobs for Cabinet and Congress Members, Inspector Generals, and Apprentices – and Honoring Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman

To provide for an exception to a limitation against appointment of persons as Secretary of Defense within seven years of relief from active duty as a regular commissioned officer of the Armed Forces (HR 35) – Prior to passage of this bill, a former service member could not be appointed as Secretary of Defense until separation from active duty for at least seven years. This legislation allows someone to be appointed after only four years from active duty as a commissioned officer of a regular component of the Armed Forces. The bill was introduced by Rep. Adam Smith (D-WA) on Jan. 15, passed in the House and the Senate on Jan. 22 and signed into law by President Biden on Jan. 22.

Officer Eugene Goodman Congressional Gold Medal Act (S 35) – This act authorizes awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman for his actions to protect the Senate chamber during the Capitol security breach on Jan. 6. It passed in the Senate amid a standing ovation. In addition to Officer Goodman’s recent promotion to acting deputy sergeant-at-arms for the Senate, this medal represents the highest honor Congress can bestow. The act was introduced by Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) on Jan. 22, and passed in the Senate on Feb. 12. The House is also considering plans to honor the officer.

National Apprenticeship Act of 2021 (HR 447) – This bill was introduced by Rep. Robert Scott (D-VA) on Jan. 25. The purpose of the legislation is to amend the 1937 National Apprenticeship Act to include youth apprenticeships, and for other purposes. The legislation authorizes the establishment of criteria for quality standards, apprenticeship agreements and acceptable uses for grant funds awarded under this act. The bill passed in the House on Feb. 5 and is currently in the Senate for consideration.

Inspector General Protection Act (HR 23) – This act requires the president to notify Congress any time an inspector general is placed on nonduty status, and to nominate a new inspector general within 210 days after a vacancy occurs. Otherwise, within 30 days after the end of that period, the president must explain to Congress the reasons why there is not yet a formal nomination, with a target date for making that nomination. The bill was introduced by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA) on Jan. 4. It passed in the House on Jan. 5 and is currently under consideration in the Senate.

Regarding consent to assemble outside the seat of government (H.Con.Res. 1) – In light of the disruption of Congressional duties due to the coronavirus, the House passed this concurrent resolution authorizing the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate to assemble the House and the Senate outside the District of Columbia whenever the public interest warrants it. Introduced by Rep. James McGovern (D-MA), this bill was both presented and passed in the House on Jan. 4. It is currently under consideration in the Senate.

Congressional Budget Justification Transparency Act of 2021 (HR 22) – This bill was introduced by Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL) on Jan. 4 and passed in the House the next day. It would require federal agencies to make budget justification materials accessible to the public on a website managed by the Office of Management and Budget. Available information should include a list of the agencies that submit budget justification materials to Congress and the dates they were submitted, with links to the actual materials. This bill is currently under review in the Senate.

Prosecution for Use of Performance Enhancement Drugs, Modernizing Government Technology, and Enhancements for Veterans and Their Caregivers

Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act of 2019 (HR 835) – This bill was introduced by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) on Jan. 29, 2019. The purpose of this legislation is to give U.S. officials the power to prosecute individual athletes who used performance-enhancing drugs at international sports competitions involving American athletes. The legislation has been criticized by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as undermining the global anti-doping movement based on international cooperation, and because no other nation has extra-territorial jurisdiction in this field. The bill passed in the House in October, the Senate in November, and was signed into law by the president on Dec. 4.

IoT Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2020 (HR 1668) – This bill requires the Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to establish minimum security standards for Internet of Things devices owned or controlled by the Federal Government. The legislation was introduced by Rep. Robin Kelly (D-IL) on March 11, 2019, passed in both Houses, and was signed into law on Dec. 4.

Information Technology Modernization Centers of Excellence Program Act (HR 5901) – Introduced by Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA) on Feb. 13, this bill authorizes the establishment of an Information Technology Modernization Centers of Excellence Program. The purpose of the program is to help executive agencies adopt secure modern technology in coordination with the Department of Homeland Security. The program must provide regular reports to Congress. The legislation passed in the House in September, in the Senate in November, and was signed into law by the president on Dec. 3.

Veterans COMPACT Act of 2020 (HR 8247) – Short for Veterans Comprehensive Prevention, Access to Care and Treatment, this bill authorizes a variety of programs, policies, and reports that fall under the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Components of the legislation address transition assistance, suicide care, mental health education and treatment, healthcare, and female veteran care. It includes a program to provide education and training for caregivers and family members of veterans with mental health disorders. The bill also establishes a Task Force on Outdoor Recreation for Veterans to recommend public lands or other outdoor spaces to be used for medical treatment and therapy. The bill was introduced by Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) on Sept. 14. It passed in the House in September, the Senate in November, and was signed by the president on Dec. 5.

Wounded Veterans Recreation Act (S 327) – This bill offers a free lifetime pass to National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands to any U.S. resident who has been medically determined to be permanently disabled (must furnish adequate proof of disability and citizenship or residency), as well as to any veteran with a service-connected disability. It was introduced by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) on Feb. 4, 2019, passed in the Senate in June, the House in November, and was signed into law by the president on Dec. 3.

Transparency and Effective Accountability Measures (TEAM) for Veteran Caregivers Act (S 2216) – Designed to upgrade VA caregiver programs by identifying and formally recognizing caregivers of veterans, and notify them of assistance available under the Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers. The bill also temporarily extends benefits for veterans who are determined to be ineligible for the family caregiver program, including a monthly personal caregiver stipend. This bill was introduced by Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI) on July 23, 2019. It passed in the Senate in November, the House in December, and is currently waiting for enactment by the president.

A Flush of Protections for Veterans and Native Americans

Veterans’ Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act of 2020 (HR 6168) – Introduced by Rep. Elaine Luria (D-VA) on March 10, this bill increases Vet compensation benefits by 1.3 percent (the same as for Social Security recipients). The increase impacts veteran disability compensation, compensation for dependents, the clothing allowance for certain disabled veterans, and dependency and indemnity compensation for surviving spouses and children. This bill passed in the House in May and the Senate in September, and was signed into law by the president on Oct. 20.

Veterans’ Care Quality Transparency Act (HR 2372) – Designed to improve mental health care for veterans and reduce suicide rates, this bill was introduced by Rep. Lauren Underwood (D-IL) on April 25, 2019. It requires the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to report on all arrangements between the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA organizations related to suicide prevention and mental health services. The bill passed in the House in May, the Senate in September, and was enacted on Oct. 20.

Improving Safety and Security for Veterans Act of 2019 (S 3147) – This Act was introduced by Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) on Dec. 19, 2019. The bill passed in the Senate in December 2019, the House in November, and is waiting to be signed by the president. Following the investigation of events that ended in tragic veteran deaths in 2017 and 2018, this legislation aims to increase VA health center accountability. Specifically, it requires the Department of Veterans Affairs to submit reports to Congress detailing VA policies and procedures relating to patient safety and quality of care. The first report is due within 30 days after the bill is written into law.

Whole Veteran Act (HR 2359) – This bill was introduced by Rep. Connor Lamb (D-PA) on April 25, 2019. The purpose of this legislation is to expand VA Health efforts to deploy a holistic model of care that focuses on patient engagement and total health. It includes integrating non-drug approaches, such as hypnosis and acupuncture, with standard medical treatment. The bill passed in the House in May, the Senate in October, and was signed into law by the president on Oct. 30.

Vet Center Eligibility Expansion Act (HR 1812) – This legislation extends readjustment counseling and related mental health services to non-combat veterans. These benefits are now available to National Guard and Reserve troops whose service includes fighting national disasters and other emergency and crisis situations. Introduced by Rep. Phil Roe (R-TN) on March 18, 2019, this bill passed in the House in May, the Senate in September, and was signed by the president on Oct. 20.

A bill to nullify the Supplemental Treaty Between the United States of America and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of Indians of Middle Oregon, concluded on Nov. 15, 1865 (S 832) – This bill nullifies the supplemental treaty between the United States and this particular tribe in Middle Oregon, which was signed in 1865. The treaty restricted the tribe members from leaving the reservation, among other conditions. The Department of the Interior has stated that the treaty was never enforced by the federal government or Oregon. The legislation was introduced by Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) on March 19, 2019, passed in both Houses, and signed into law on Oct. 20.

Native American Business Incubators Program Act (S 294) – This bill establishes a grant program to provide business incubation and other business services to Native American entrepreneurs and businesses. It was introduced by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) on Jan. 31, 2019, passed in both Houses, and signed by the president on Oct. 20.